x
Breaking News
More () »

Washington, DC's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Washington, DC | WUSA9.com

VERIFY: Is Disneyland banning screaming on rides because of COVID19?

Dozens of viral videos on TikTok and Facebook have shared what looks to be guidelines from major parks saying shouting won't be allowed. But is it true?

WASHINGTON — As the weather warms up and vaccinations continue to ramp up around the country, many businesses and activities have started to announce reopening plans. 

Amongst those are amusement parks, some of which have reopening plans that are causing a buzz on social media for their supposed new policies. Dozens of people have shared headlines that say parks like Disneyland are "banning" shouting from thrill rides like roller coasters in an effort to be safer in times of social distancing.

But are they true? The Verify team tracked down the answers.

QUESTION:

Is it true that shouting and screaming will not be allowed on rides at Disneyland once they reopen?

ANSWER:

No, Disneyland has not enforced such a policy.

This is false.

SOURCES:

PROCESS:

With spring and summer coming up, trying to find outdoor activities that still accommodate COVID precautions has many sharing their plans online. With major theme parks like California Adventure and Disneyland reopening, many of those experiences are looking a little different, causing a stir online.

"As guidelines begin to be released, we’ve learned that guests will have to limit shouting at the parks - even on roller coasters!" reads this Instagram post from DisneylandNewsToday, which has over 160k followers. The guidelines from the park have also made appearances like this on TikTok:

... and also on Facebook, where an image shows what looks to be a newscast graphic saying there is a " ‘no scream’ policy on roller coasters," and a second line that reads "Disneyland enforcing policy." 

But is this true? Our researchers tracked down the answers, and we can say that this one is false.

While there is a reopening guideline plan from a trade group for amusement parks in California, which discusses limiting activities "known to cause increased spread", there isn't one directly outlined for Disney or their parks. 

That plan is from the California Attractions and Parks Association, a trade group that oversees much of the California attraction and amusement industry and works with regulators and law officials on issues like ride safety or tourism. 

CAPAS reopening plan lists out a variety of guidelines, from physical distancing measures to reducing capacity measures, but doesn't mention anything about "banning" screaming on rides.

The group since wrote a Twitter thread clearing up the confusion:

"California’s amusement parks are excited to reopen responsibly under the recently released state guidance for the amusement park industry," the thread reads. "These guidelines do not require parks to prohibit screaming."

Instead, the group offers a blueprint for social distancing efforts parks should take, including mask-wearing and limiting where food and drink hubs are.

Disneyland has not officially commented on the screaming policy but did confirm in March 17 post that the park and California Adventure would officially re-open April 30 with some operational changes.

"Just as the Downtown Disney District at Disneyland Resort reopened with enhanced health and safety measures, operational changes will be in place at the theme parks and hotels to align with guidance from health authorities and learnings from our parks around the world to promote physical distancing, enhanced cleanliness and reduced contact," the post reads. "This guidance is fluid and applicable at any given time as community situations change."

So we can Verify that Disneyland is re-opening its rides, but there is no enforced or official "no screaming" policy at the park.

RELATED: VERIFY: Here's why your misprinted $20 could be worth $500

RELATED: VERIFY: Can you get COVID-19 if you're fully vaccinated?

Download the brand-new WUSA9 app here.

Sign up for the Get Up DC newsletter: Your forecast. Your commute. Your news.