Dr. Carter G. Woodson is known as the father of Black History Month. He wrote many scholarly works about African American history right in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, DC. His home at 1538 9th St NW, is now National Historic Site. But here are three things you may not of known about Carter G. Woodson:

1. Woodson picked when Black History was because of specific birthdays

Noted historian, Dr. Carter G. Woodson started Negro History Week in 1926. He chose the week in February, when two iconic figures for African American history were born: Abraham Lincoln on February 12th and Frederick Douglass on February 14th. The entire month of February became Black History Month in 1976.

2. A woman was behind the mass production of Dr. Woodson's work

Dr. Woodson was highly educated, with a PhD from Harvard University. But not all African Americans at the time could digest Dr. Woodson's high-level writing, so it was the idea of Mary McLeod Bethune to have Dr. Woodson publish the Negro History Bulletin to the masses, which is now called the Black History Bulletin.

3. Dr. Woodson loved children

Educating children was very important to Dr. Woodson. He loved reaching children and worked to do so in the Negro History Bulletin, including interactive sections for puzzles and coloring. Even now, in the organization that he created the ASALH there is a youth component called Kiamsha.

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