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'What are you going to call us now?' | Player reactions to Washington's nickname and logo change

Here is a look at how past and present players have reacted to Washington's NFL team changing its nickname and logo.

WASHINGTON — Dan Snyder and his D.C. football team are officially changing its nickname and logo.

Past and former players are reacting to the fact that 'Redskins' will not represent the team going forward. Some included praise for Snyder finally changing the name. 

The sportsbook BetOnline has the Redtails (3/1), Generals (4/1) and Presidents (5/1) as the three top name choices to replace Redskins, according to Sports Illustrated's reporting.

Dwayne Haskins, Washington's second-year quarterback:

"As a kid who grew up in the DMV it’ll always be HTTR but looking forward to the future."

Mark May, a two time Super Bowl-winning offensive lineman for Washington:

"It kind of hurts a little bit because I was a part of the Redskins during a great time. We went to Super Bowls in the '80s and '90s. And to reflect on those...what are you going to call us now? But it's about change. And it's about time the Redskins change their name. I think Daniel Snyder needs to be applauded about this. Cause he’s the one who has to reach deep, deep down into those pockets and pay for this. The decision that he made had to be a tough one, but I really applaud his decision."

RELATED: Washington Redskins to retire team name

Darrell Greene, Washington Hall of Famer cornerback:

"I’m grateful and I applaud Dan Snyder for today and his response. I'm not worried about how the response got here, I’m just glad that the bus showed up. I'm glad that today is called today and that we are moving forward."

Green also spoke with WUSA9 about it being time to have some tough conversations about race and culture in Washington’s football history and how he would like to be a part of those discussions.

“The conversation would be ‘hey should there be an apology, should there be some management of repair?' How do we make the defrauded whole? Green asked. “Those are conversations that you do get into.”

RELATED: Meet the man who trademarked nearly every replacement option for Washington's NFL team name

Former Washington quarterback Doug Williams spoke to ESPN about the name and logo change:

"We won as Redskins, we won the game," Williams said. "But at the end of the day, it's about the players and we still deserve our rings because we did it, the name didn't do it. That's all we can say. The name changes, but the city doesn't change and the teams don't change, the franchise doesn't change. It's just the name and the logo. It should not have an impact on the history of the organization."

Vernon Davis, former tight end and a DMV native:

 “Growing up a Redskins fan, it was something we looked forward to in the community in Washington, D.C… it was everything. So, to see the name change is bittersweet. And I say that because of the tradition and the Super Bowls, and every game that we watched on Sunday. It’s tough to see the name go.”

RELATED: Native American son of Redskins logo designer says it's not offensive, calls the change 'hard'

Changing Washington's NFL team logo is bittersweet for the family of the man who originally designed it.

Washington's logo has been an Indian chief since 1971. It was designed by Native American Walter “Blackie” Wetzel to depict a member of the Blackfeet tribe.

Wetzel grew up on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana and was eventually elected president of the National Congress of American Indians in Washington, D.C. 

He was instrumental in the Redskins franchise logo change from an “R” to the current depiction of a Native American.

According to Wetzel's son, Lance, the logo is not offensive, but rather evokes a sense of pride.

"Everyone was pretty upset (about the change)," Lance Wetzel said. "Everyone understood the name change we were all on board with that. Once they weren't going to use the logo, it was hard. It takes away from the Native Americans. When I see that logo, I take pride in it. You look at the depiction of the Redskins logo and it’s of a true Native American. I always felt it was representing my people. That's not gone" 

RELATED: The Latest: Odds on new nickname for Washington's football team

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