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Montana, Ohio added to DC Health's 'high-risk' states list

Here's an updated list of states that are considered 'high risk,' according to the DC Health Department.

WASHINGTON — The District has updated its list of "high-risk states" that will require travelers to self-quarantine for two weeks upon arrival to D.C. due to the coronavirus.

The states added to the list are Montana and Ohio. Alaska and Arizona have been removed from the list, according to D.C. Health.

Officials re-added Montana to the list after removing the state a few weeks ago.

The travel order applies to people coming to the District for non-essential activities. On the other hand, those who are entering the D.C. region for essential travel or after essential travel are urged to monitor any potential symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days. If they have any symptoms, they must self-quarantine and get tested or seek medical attention.

During the time people are self-quarantining, the mayor’s order requires travelers to stay in their home or hotel room and only leave for essential medical appointments or essential goods when delivery of food or other essential goods aren't available. The order also says guests are not allowed.

The order does not apply to neighboring states such as Virginia and Maryland.

Here's the list of high-risk states below (last updated on Sept. 8)

Alabama
Arkansas
California
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Wisconsin 

High-risk states are states where the seven-day moving average of daily new COVID-19 cases is 10 or more per 100,000 persons, D.C. Health Department said.

An updated list will be released every two weeks on the city's health department website.

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