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How VA hospitals are dealing with coronavirus cases amid spike in the veteran population

D.C. has 44 veterans that are suffering from the COVID-19 coronavirus. Just over the last day or two, 14 U.S. vets have died from the virus.

WASHINGTON — It doesn't take long to realize how the COVID-19 coronavirus is impacting the United States' military veterans. 

In D.C. alone, 49 veterans are suffering from the coronavirus, with more than a third of them being treated at a local Veterans Affairs Medical Center.  

These local cases are part of 1,602 positive veteran cases in the U.S. And so far, 53 veterans have died from the coronavirus, according to numbers put out by Veterans Affairs

According to the VA, out of the 53 deaths, 26 of those came over the last few days. Suggesting that deaths among veterans could be rising quicker, as this virus still greatly affects the nation. seven recent veteran deaths were linked to the same VA Medical Center in New Orleans, as Louisiana becomes the latest state to be hit hard by COVID-19.

This all comes after last week, Veterans Affairs reported a 60 percent increase in coronavirus cases among its veteran population, according to CBS News.

And while bigger cities are seeing the brunt of coronavirus cases in veterans -- cities like New Orleans, New York, Los Angeles and D.C. -- states in the Mid-Atlantic region are also seeing veterans being impacted. 

VA Medical Centers in Maryland and Virginia are also seeing veterans test positive for the coronavirus. These cities include Baltimore and Richmond, plus the Hampton Roads region of Virginia has also seen cases.

Walter Reed Medical Center, located just outside the District in Bethesda, has taken several measures to protect its veterans, including changing visitation hours, which was implemented on March 18, and changed how its pharmacies interact with veterans and customers.

And, Walter Reed also changed the way people could enter the hospital, and have access to its offices and labs. 

To learn more about what Walter Reed is doing, click here

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