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DMV grocery stores are starting to ban using reusable grocery bags. Here's why

To help combat the coronavirus, some grocery stores are not letting customers use their own reusable bags inside stores.

WASHINGTON — A sign outside a local Trader Joe's shared that the store would not let its customers bring and use their own reusable bags. While it may be something you're just hearing about, it's a practice that is being used by multiple grocery store chains in the DMV area. 

Some of these grocery and convenience stores believe that limiting customers' use of reusable bags can help stop the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. 

While it's not illegal to use reusable bags in D.C., Maryland and Virginia, some states like New Hampshire and Illinois have banned the use of these bags, according to MarketWatch

Whole Foods is still letting customers bring their reusable bags into stores, but its telling customers that they will have to bag their own groceries. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not said people need to stop using reusable bags, but the agency did give guidance to frequently wash these types of bags that are normally used at grocery stores. 

Credit: WUSA9
Where you can and can't use reusable bags in DMV grocery stores.

Grocery stores are remaining open during the coronavirus pandemic, and many companies are working to keep their stores clean. 

Lots of grocery store chains are also allowing senior citizens and those with underlying medical conditions, the chance to shop at stores during safer hours. 

See more on how groceries stores and how they are adjusting to the coronavirus in the stories below:

RELATED: Here's how DMV grocery stores are helping senior citizens during coronavirus pandemic

RELATED: DC-area grocery stores are protecting you from the coronavirus, including a change in hours. Here's how

RELATED: Grocery store clerks should be considered 'first responders' says union rep

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