According to a recent report from The Lancet, infectious diseases continue to affect millions of individuals despite new vaccines.

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WASHINGTON (WUSA9) --While new vaccinations to help to end many diseases, these same preventable illnesses remain a major health concern in the United States. According to a recent report from The Lancet's new series, The health of Americans, sexually transmitted infections, animal borne illnesses, food poisoning and re-emerging sicknesses continue to affect millions of individuals despite new medical and educational developments.

When vaccines for the measles, the mumps and whooping cough were created, the infectious diseases where thought to be contained and even eliminated. However, The Lancet says these diseases are still prevalent and have even resulted in recent outbreaks. Non-vaccinated travelers and parents who do not want their child vaccinated are some of the reasons provided for the outbreaks, along with waning vaccine-induced immunity.

The Lancet also calls for greater protection against food borne illnesses and infections from healthcare facilities. The article states that 48 million Americans are affected by food poisoning every year, and 3,000 Americans die from food associated illnesses. The article also reports that 20 percent of patients in hospitals develop a healthcare associated infection including infections in the bloodstream, urinary tract and surgical site. The overuse of antibiotics could also lead to antimicrobial resistance, making future doses antibiotics ineffective in treatment.

Despite the current issues in infectious disease prevention, The Lancet also cites ways the medical, legal and industrial communities are responding to these concerns on a national and international level. Genome testing is helping to further ways to prevent infectious disease medically. In February, the U.S. and other countries also joined together to discuss a new global health security agenda designed to help identify and prevent further spread of disease, The Lancet reports.

Written by

Alana Yzola, (WUSA9)

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