Laura Metro started CPR parties from her home in Potomac. The concept took off and now CPR parties are happening all over the country.

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POTOMAC, Md. (WUSA9) -- It's an early spring evening at the Metro residence, with lots of champagne, macaroons, sprinkles and laughter. It's a great time with neighbors and close friends. Items are showcased in a show-and-tell fashion, but this isn't your typical Tupperware or jewelry party. The goal is to learn how to save lives. It's a CPR party!

Laura Metro, founder of the C.L.A.Y. Foundation says, "People are familiar with the concept of an in-home shopping party whether it's a jewelry party or a cooking party and I thought, that's something that I get invitations for all the time.

Metro started CPR parties from her home in Potomac. The concept took off and now CPR parties are happening all over the country.

A near family tragedy involving Laura's young son, Clay, was her inspiration. 3 years ago, Clay nearly drowned in a swimming pool accident. He tripped on a towel and fell into the deep end of the pool while being watched by family friends.

Metro says, "We ran into the pool and our friend was doing CPR on our son who was blue and lifeless on the pool deck. The doctors, everyone said it was by standard CPR that saved him from having severe brain damage."

Clay was in a coma for 2 days, but eventually made a full recovery. The very scary situation was a wake-up call for Laura who realized that she could have been better prepared.

"I didn't know CPR, there was no AED there. I couldn't really understand why I didn't know CPR and I was kind of ashamed by it," adds Metro.

So she made it her mission to prepare others for life-threatening situations. She started the C.L.A.Y. Foundation to advocate for CPR training, AED availability, and swim instruction for all. The foundation set up the parties and works with Rescue One Training for Life to arrange the CPR training.

Party guests learn CPR, how to operate an AED, and how to prevent others from choking.

Lori Clogg of Darnestown, Md. says, "You go to tupperware or Avon or the jewelry party or the purse party and you come home with at least $100 worth of stuff that you don't need or even want. This is something that I do need and will keep forever."

These parties are an introduction to CPR and participants are encouraged to get certified. The parties are free but there is a suggested donation of $35 to offset costs. If you want to host your own CPR party through the C.L.A.Y Foundation go to www.theclayfoundation.org.

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