A delegate in Virginia said pornography isn't just something that happens in the privacy of a person’s home. He declared it a public health crisis and the government should label it as that.

Delegate Bob Marshall, who represents portions of Prince William and Loudoun counties, said pornography destroys marriages, contributes to the hyper-sexualization of teens, promotes negative body images, normalizes violence, and demeans women.

"Rape is overwhelming committed by males. Pornography is overwhelming a male preoccupation looking at a female body and totally objectifying it," Del. Marshall said. "That is hardly a value judgment that I think we should reinforce or accept in American society."

Just like the surgeon general in 1964, Del. Marshall wants porn to have an official government warning.

"It simply states that pornography is a public health problem. It doesn't censor anything. It doesn't ban anything," he explained.

He hopes this resolution will appeal to members of the Virginia delegation on the left and the right.

"This really commodifies women. That comes from priests. It comes from liberal women. There is a kind of unity here," he said.

"I've always considered myself a radical political activist," said Susan Brownmiller, a notable feminist who leans left. She also wrote a book called ‘Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape.’

She thinks Marshall's proposal is a good idea.

"Pornography is readily available to young men, particularly, who confuse it with what they're supposed to do sexually," Brownmiller explained. “There is no such thing as consent in pornography. Nobody says to somebody else, ‘Hey, is it okay if we try this? What do you think?’"

Marshall's resolution may create unique partners, but it could also divide more likely allies.

"Not everything that can be harmful should be legislated," said Cathy Reisenwitz, Co-found of Feminists for Liberty. She leans a little more to the right.

"Pornography is kind of like sugar. Everyone consumes it. It's not great for you in large quantities and you have a right to use it," she added. "The big difference between porn and sugar is that your right to produce and consume sugar is not protected by the Constitution. Porn is speech and speech is constitutionally protected."