Trump promises end to Afghanistan war, more force, but no numbers or details

U.S. President Donald Trump makes a statement on the violence this past weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia at the White House on August 14, 2017.
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Analysts predicted President Trump was going to announce a surge of nearly 4,000 troops into Afghanistan, but he didn't get into specifics in his Monday night speech. 

In fact, that is part of the President’s new strategy: from a time-based approach to a conditions-approach. 

The President said the country will not announce plans, dates, or number of troops. But Mr. Trump did say the Nation must seek an honorable and enduring outcome worthy of the lives lost in America's longest war. Troops were first sent to Afghanistan in 2001 after the 911 terror attacks. 

RELATED: Trump renews Afghan war commitment, sees no speedy exit

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“The American people are weary of war without victory, I share the American people’s frustration,” said Mr. Trump.

Against his original instinct to pull out of Afghanistan, the President said the Nation will not withdraw troops like his predecessor President Obama.

 “The vacuum we left allowed Isis to grow. We cannot repeat the mistakes leaders made in Iraq,” Trump said, “we are not nation building again we are killing terrorists.” 

The President speaking to soldiers at Fort Myer, highlighted that his new plan gives soldiers more authority to target terrorists. 

“These killers need to know there is no place to hide,” the President said, “retribution will be fast and powerful.”

The President also threatened to end American’s partnership with Pakistan if that country continues to harbor terrorists. He said America will work with NATO and global partners to support Afghanistan’s autonomy.

“Strategically applied force…will lead to a lasting peace.  However, our commitment is not unlimited and our support is not a blank check.”  Before getting into the meat of his 30 primetime speech, the President seemingly made a comment about the racial unrest in Charlottesville by saying: “We cannot remain a force for peace in the world if we cannot keep peace at home.”