Double amputee veteran running 31 marathons in 31 days

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For veteran Rob Jones, quitting was never an option. And that will be on full display, as he finishes a grueling voyage to run 31 marathons in 31 days. This dedication is despite the fact that life was not always fair to him.

In 2010, he was serving as a combat engineer in Afghanistan, when his life changed forever. 

"My job was to find buried IED's in Afghanistan," he said. "July 22nd, an IED found me first." 

He lost both of his legs in the explosion, and was sent home. It was in that moment that he needed to find a new direction, and yet he said he wasn't resentful or angry. 

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"I was just glad to be alive," he said. 

One year later, Jones was walking with his prosthetic legs. By 2012, he was winning medals in the Paralympic Games. A silver lining, he met his wife, Pamela at those games. 

"A gold lining actually," he laughed. 

From there, Jones continued to push forward. In October of 2013, Jones went on a cross-country bike ride, traveling 5,180 miles over 180 days. All in all, he raised $126,000 for the Coalition to Salute America's Heroes, The Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund, and Ride 2 Recovery. 

His Latest Voyage

Now, this weekend will bring the culmination of a month-long voyage across the country. He set an ambitious goal for himself, to run 31 marathons in 31 days in 31 cities. He started in London, and since then he's traveled all across the country, from New York City and Boston to Seattle and Los Angeles. 

On Friday, Jones was joined by more than 50 people for a run through Baltimore, starting at Camden Yards. He was accompanied by police officers, marines, and community members. The Police Commissioner presented him with an award for his accomplishments. 

Pamela said the word 'inspirational' is often overused, although it's no doubt appropriate for her husband. 

"He is an example," she said. "To me as his wife, to his friends and family, and to people that have never met him before. He's an example of how to not allow setbacks and hurdles to slow you down. And how to actually see them as a way to make you stronger." 

Rob's journey will end in D.C., with a run on Saturday morning, starting at the Lincoln Memorial. The run will start at 7:00a.m. If you want to go the race, you can find more information here. If you want to donate, you can do so here.