How to contact your member of Congress

Source: WUSA
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Are you trying to spur change in the government or address a community concern? Your best bet is to contact a member of Congress or better yet, your member of Congress.

Policymakers are more likely to closely consider the views of constituents in their states and/or districts. Options for reaching out to members of both legislative chambers range from a simple tweet to a face-to-face visit.

Here’s how the process works.

1.    Find out who represents you:

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Each state has two Senators while the number of House Representatives ranges based on your state’s population. You can find your Senator by searching via the state they serve. Take it one step further by searching for your specific state district to find your Congressman/woman on the House side.

2.    Make a call:

Members have multiple offices. Give their DC office and/or hometown district office a call to express your views.

3.    Send a letter or email:

Each Senator and Representative has their own website with an email form directly attached to it. If you prefer the envelope and stamp route, send a letter to their DC office. Letters should be addressed to specific buildings and rooms for Capitol Hill offices as such:

For Congressmen/women:

The Honorable (Full Name)

(Room #) (Building Name) House Office Building

United States House of Representatives

Washington, D.C. 20515

 

For Senators:

The Honorable (Full Name)

(Room #) (Building Name) Senate Office Building

United States Senate

Washington, D.C. 20510

4.    Tweet or post:

Hold your government officials accountable by publicly spreading your message. Every member has a Twitter and/or Facebook account. Find out what their account handle is and post away!

5.    Use your voice:

Members of Congress typically hold town halls and meet with constituents in person. Contact your representative's office to learn more about their schedule of events.

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If you feel passionate about proposed legislation or simply want to exercise your first amendment rights, we urge you to contact your members of Congress. The above search tool allows you to find the contact information for every representative. You can also find specific office addresses and committee assignments here.

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